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Tewkesbury Road
by
John Masefield


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It is good to be out on the road, and going one knows not where,
Going through meadow and village, one knows not whither or why;
 
Through the grey light drift of the dust, in the keen cool rush of the air,
Under the flying white clouds, and the broad blue lift of the sky.

And to halt at the chattering brook, in a tall green fern at the brink
Where the harebell grows, and the gorse, and the foxgloves purple and white;
 
Where the shifty-eyed delicate deer troop down to the brook to drink
When the stars are mellow and large at the coming on of the night.

O, to feel the beat of the rain, and the homely smell of the earth,
Is a tune for the blood to jig to, and joy past power of words;
 
And the blessed green comely meadows are all a-ripple with mirth
At the noise of the lambs at play and the dear wild cry of the birds.

This poem is in the public domain.
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John Masefield (1878-1967) was an English poet, author, and playwright. Both his parents died while he was a child, and at the age of thirteen, annoyed with John's "addiction" to reading, the aunt in charge of caring for him sent him off to train for a life as a sailor. Although his experiences at sea provided much material for the stories and poems he would later write, John soon tired of that harsh life and, on a voyage to New York, he jumped ship. For two years, he worked at odd jobs in that city, using his free time for reading and writing. He eventually returned to England, married, had two children, and established himself as a significant literary talent. As his stature as a writer continued to grow, John became an internationally successful lecturer and was appointed as England's poet laureate, a position he held for nearly forty years. He actively wrote and published until he was 88 years old.


New comments are closed for now.
gerard coughlan:
Wonderful lyricism and evocation of place, in this uplifting poem.I can recite lines from it-forty years on from first encountering it , in school. As a fellow poet, I love those ,rare moments when 'all the world is paradise'. Gerard Coughlan.
Posted 10/07/2013 04:08 AM
rose haven:
"The broad blue lift of the sky" is one wonderful line!
Posted 04/08/2013 10:47 AM
MaryLeeHahn:
This one's good, but nothing's better than Sea Fever!
Posted 04/08/2013 05:09 AM


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