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The Sun Has Long Been Set
by
William Wordsworth


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The sun has long been set,
The stars are out by twos and threes,
The little birds are piping yet
Among the bushes and trees;
There's a cuckoo, and one or two thrushes,
And a far-off wind that rushes,
And a sound of water that gushes,
And the cuckoo's sovereign cry
Fills all the hollow of the sky.
Who would "go parading"
In London, "and masquerading,"
On such a night of June
With that beautiful soft half-moon,
And all these innocent blisses?
On such a night as this is!


This poem is in the public domain.


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William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850) was a British Romantic poet. Though he suffered much tragedy in his personal life, he also enjoyed several deeply satisfying friendships, including ones with fellow poet Samuel Coleridge, and with his sister Dorothy, a writer in her own right. Wordsworth traveled extensively and was deeply influenced by his love of nature; both passions are evident in many of his poems. He lived much of his life in Englandís beautiful Lake District, and served as Poet Laureate of England from 1843 until his death.


Post New Comment:
Jancan:
LOVE it!
Posted 06/22/2019 11:34 AM
paradea:
Beautiful!
Posted 06/22/2019 10:10 AM
michael escoubas:
Too many lines for a sonnet, but oh, how delightful his rhymes! Thank you Jayne!
Posted 06/22/2019 08:00 AM


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