My Cart 
Login 

This site exists for one purpose only: to help dispel the ugly and absolutely untrue myth that poetry is boring. Granted, a lot of poetry is boring, but you won't find it here. At Your Daily Poem, you'll find poetry that is touching, funny, provocative, inspiring, uplifting, and surprising. It may punch you in the gut, it may bring tears to your eyes, it may make you laugh out loud, but it most assuredly will not bore you.

Poetry on YDP—by poets living and long dead, famous to completely unknown--is specially selected for accessibility and appeal. Thanks so much for visiting—and remember: a poem a day keeps the doldrums away!

 




The Child Who Would Not Be Washed
by
H. P. Nichols

"Don't wash me, pray, mamma, today,"
I once heard little Jennie say,
"For oh! so very hard you rub,
I never want to see my tub."

"O, very well," her mother said;
"I'll put you back again to bed;
And you must in your night-gown stay,
Nor come down stairs at all to-day."

And then I heard Miss Jennie cry,
And beg mamma to let her try;
And say, as she had done before,
That she'd so naughty be no more.

Her mother turned and left her there;
She heard her step upon the stair;
But in her chamber, all day long,
She staid alone, for doing wrong.

She heard her sister jump and run,
And longed to join her in her fun;
Her brother made a snow-man high;
But she upon her bed must lie.

She heard the merry sleigh-bells ring,
And to the door come clattering;
But Jennie could not go to ride
In night-clothes by her father's side.

And glad was she, as you may guess,
The next day to put on her dress;
She ran and told her mother then
She never would do so again.


This poem is in the public domain.

 

 

Henry P. Nichols (1816 - 1890) was from Salem, Massachusetts. He operated a very successful publishing company in Boston in the mid-1800s with partner William Crosby. The company later became Nichols & Noyes.

 



Post New Comment:
Adriana:
clever rhymes, awful punishment for not wanting to be rubbed hard in washing - mother wrong on two counts - ending makes no sense: child was glad to put on her dress and would never do so again ???
Posted 01/24/2022 04:19 PM
wordartdjc:
And yes, I smiled just as I should For this now was a child who could resist the plans that mother taught and learned her lesson as she aught! (now how is that for truly 'bad' poetry.)
Posted 01/24/2022 11:51 AM
wordartdjc:

Posted 01/24/2022 11:42 AM
njc:
In other words--"I can't make you do it, but I can sure make you wish you had." Lesson learned...but did Mother also consider that maybe she could use a softer touch?
Posted 01/24/2022 09:01 AM
Michael:
Thank you, Jayne, for this delightful and fanciful post! Really enjoyed it.
Posted 01/24/2022 08:20 AM
KevinArnold:
A crafty little poem, fun. Another great find.
Posted 01/24/2022 07:16 AM
Contents of this web site and all original text and images therein are copyright © by Your Daily Poem. All rights reserved.
As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Purchasing books through any poet's Amazon links helps to support Your Daily Poem.
The material on this site may not be copied, reproduced, downloaded, distributed, transmitted, stored, altered, adapted,
or otherwise used in any way without the express written permission of the owner.