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The First Artichoke
by
Diane Lockward

 

Though everyone said no one could grow
artichokes in New Jersey, my father
planted the seeds and grew one magnificent
artichoke, late-season, long after the squash,
tomatoes, and zucchini.

It was the derelict in my father’s garden,
little Buddha of a vegetable, pinecone gone awry.
It was as strange as a bony-plated armadillo.

My mother prepared the artichoke as if preparing
a miracle. She snipped the bronzy winter-kissed tips,
mashed breadcrumbs, oregano, parmesan, garlic,
and lemon, stuffed the mush between the leaves,
baked, then placed the artichoke on the table.
This, she said, was food we could eat with our fingers.

When I hesitated, my father spoke of beautiful Cynara,
who’d loved her mother more than she’d loved Zeus.
In anger, the god transformed her
into an artichoke. And in 1949 Marilyn Monroe
had been crowned California’s first Artichoke Queen.

I peeled off a leaf like my father did,
dipped it in melted butter, and with my teeth
scraped and sucked the nut-flavored slimy stuff.
We piled up the inedible parts, skeletons
of leaves and purple prickles.

Piece by piece, the artichoke came apart,
the way we would in 1959, the year the flowerbuds
of the artichokes in my father’s garden bloomed
without him, their blossoms seven inches wide
and violet-blue as bruises.

But first we had that miracle on our table.
We peeled and peeled, a vegetable striptease,
and worked our way deeper and deeper,
down to the small filet of delectable heart.

From What Feeds Us (Wind Publications, 2006).
Used here with the author’s permission.

Diane Lockward is the author of The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop (Wind Publications, 2013), three poetry books, and two chapbooks. Her work has been included in numerous anthologies and journals and she runs two annual poetry events: The West Caldwell Poetry Festival and Girl Talk. Diane lives in West Caldwell, New Jersey, where she and her husband do restaurant reviews at Eating Well Reviews, www.ewreviews.com. Learn more about Diane at www.dianelockward.com.

 



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