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Evening Star
by
Edgar Allan Poe


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’Twas noontide of summer,
And mid-time of night;
And stars, in their orbits,
Shone pale, thro’ the light
Of the brighter, cold moon,
’Mid planets her slaves,
Herself in the Heavens,
Her beam on the waves.
I gazed awhile
On her cold smile;
Too cold--too cold for me--
There pass’d, as a shroud,
A fleecy cloud,
And I turned away to thee,
Proud Evening Star,
In thy glory afar,
And dearer thy beam shall be;
For joy to my heart
Is the proud part
Thou bearest in Heaven at night,
And more I admire
Thy distant fire,
Than that colder, lowly light. 

 

This poem is in the public domain.


 

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Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849) was an American poet, journalist, and critic. Credited with inventing the detective story genre, he also played a significant a role in improving international copyright law and increasing wages for writers during the early 19th century. Though he published his first book at 18 and spent his entire professional life in one writing pursuit or another, Edgar didn’t achieve widespread acclaim until "The Raven" was published in 1845. Even then, he continued to be plagued by the poverty and personal tragedy that makes his life read like one of his own tales. Edgar died at the age of 40, from causes still undetermined. Read more about his life here.

 


New comments are closed for now.
69Dorcas:
I enjoyed the poem.
Posted 08/17/2012 07:01 AM
marenomitchell:
I agree, Marilyn. Not a bad poet!
Posted 08/16/2012 10:44 AM
Marilyn L Taylor:
This Poe guy sounds really promising as a poet, don't you think?
Posted 08/16/2012 08:56 AM
KevinArnold:
Poe praises Venus, of course.
Posted 08/16/2012 08:46 AM
Larry Schug:
This is a good poem. I enjoyed reading it despite its antiquated language. Often, when I'm speaking to students, even in high school, I see that they try to write like this using words like "thee" and "thro'". This should be read in schools, but also current work, in my opinion, even by "unknowns" should be part of the classroom experience.
Posted 08/16/2012 08:44 AM


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