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Freeway North to San Francisco
by
Mary Lou Taylor


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Out of the mix of oily black
and molten light
a rainbow rises
each wide band
clear and separate
as strands of colored ribbon.
It arcs across the sky
comes to rest on hilly green.
 
 
Instead of fading
hiding the spot
where the pot of gold lies buried
this one holds its color
slides down a roadside oak
dyes it in paler hues
enters my car, moves closer
rests in the seat beside me.
 
From The Fringes of Hollywood (Jacaranda Press, 2002).
Used with the author’s permission.
 
Purchase a framed print of this poem.

Mary Lou Taylor tried three other majors before settling on English. A teacher off and on for many years, she got serious about writing poetry after she retired. Author of one book and published in several journals and anthologies, she has a second book in the works and has proven retirement to be the myth it so often is by continuing to teach a few writing and poetry classes. Learn more about Mary Lou, who lives in Saratoga, California, atwww.maryloutaylor.wordpress.com.


New comments are closed for now.
Rogers:
Love it - especially the ending!
Posted 03/25/2013 10:54 AM
diane:
That was fun!
Posted 03/24/2013 09:27 PM
KevinArnold:
Yes, you can't tell a poem by its title here for sure. Galway Kinnell once told there is often an obvious title--what you'd call it on its Manila folder--in this case something like Morning Rainbow--and you can use that title, or you can add to the poem by introducing a new slant on how to read the poem with the title as MLT has done here. Nice work.
Posted 03/23/2013 11:25 AM
peninsulapoet:
Lovely poem
Posted 03/23/2013 10:40 AM
erinsnana:
magical and vivid!
Posted 03/23/2013 10:09 AM
dotief@comcast.net:
Nice!
Posted 03/23/2013 09:07 AM
jeanie:
the magic of s.f. ...
Posted 03/23/2013 08:38 AM


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