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The Happy Household
by
Eugene Field


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It's when the birds go piping and the daylight slowly breaks,
That, clamoring for his dinner, our precious baby wakes;
Then it's sleep no more for baby, and it's sleep no more for me,
For, when he wants his dinner, why it's dinner it must be!
And of that lacteal fluid he partakes with great ado,
While gran'ma laughs,
And gran'pa laughs,
And wife, she laughs,
And I well, I laugh, too!

You'd think, to see us carrying on about that little tad,
That, like as not, that baby was the first we'd ever had;
But, sakes alive! he isn't, yet we people make a fuss
As if the only baby in the world had come to us!
And, morning,
 noon, and night-time, whatever he may do,
Gran'ma, she laughs,
Gran'pa, he laughs,
Wife, she laughs,
And I, of course, laugh, too!

But once a likely spell ago when that poor little chick
From teething or from some such ill of infancy fell sick,
You wouldn't know us people as the same that went about
A-feelin' good all over, just to hear him crow and shout;
And, though the doctor poohed our fears and said he'd pull him through,
Old gran'ma cried,
And gran'pa cried,
And wife, she cried,
And I –
yes, I cried, too!

It makes us all feel good to have a baby on the place,
With his everlastin' crowing and his dimpling, dumpling face;
The patter of his pinky feet makes music everywhere,
And when he shakes those fists of his, good-by to every care!
No matter what our trouble is, when he begins to coo,
Old gran'ma laughs,
And gran'pa laughs,
Wife, she laughs,
And I you bet, I laugh, too!

 

This poem is in the public domain.

 

Purchase a framed print of this poem.

Eugene Field (1850 –1895) was born in St. Louis, Missouri, raised in Amherst, Massachusetts, and spent most of his adult life in Chicago. Best known for his children’s poetry and humorous essays, he explored acting and law before turning to a very successful career in journalism. Eugene lost both parents before he was 20, buried three of his eight children, and died himself when he was only 45. He nonetheless seemed to have a happy and satisfying life, publishing more than a dozen books and forever endearing himself to the world’s children by penning such classic poems as “The Duel” and “Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.” Eugene’s home in St. Louis is preserved and open to the public.

 

 


Post New Comment:
Lori Levy:
Enjoying the baby poems.
Posted 08/23/2016 09:39 AM
rhonasheridan:
I loved this. Best of the "baby" poems. A real gem.
Posted 08/23/2016 09:29 AM
blueskies:
A delightful visit to the ups & downs of 'to see us carrying on about that little tad'...Thanks, Jayne.
Posted 08/23/2016 05:29 AM
Newf:
What a joy to read with a very early coffee. Good wishes to little Lila and the joy she will bring your family.
Posted 08/23/2016 03:22 AM


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