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A Poison Tree
by
William Blake


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I was angry with my friend:
I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe:
I told it not, my wrath did grow.
And I watered it in fears
Night and morning with my tears,
And I sunned it with smiles
And with soft deceitful wiles.
And it grew both day and night,
Till it bore an apple bright,
And my foe beheld it shine,
And he knew that it was mine, —
And into my garden stole
When the night had veiled the pole;
In the morning, glad, I see
My foe outstretched beneath the tree.

This poem is in the public domain.

 

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William Blake (1757 - 1827) was an English poet and painter. Best known today for his poem, "The Tyger," Blake enjoyed virtually no acclaim as a poet during his lifetime. Today, however, he is considered an immense talent in both literary and artistic circles. Trained as an engraver, Blake produced all but one of his poetry books himself. His wife—whom Blake himself taught to read, write, and draw—was a valued partner and critic. Much of Blake’s work focused on religious themes, with a colorful swirl of fantasy tossed in.

 


New comments are closed for now.
rhonasheridan:
It really makes you think. Very powerful
Posted 07/30/2014 04:05 AM
Ginny C.:
Keep your friends by allowing them to see your anger, keep your enemies-as enemies- by hiding the anger beneath deceitful smiles, until it shines like a poisoned apple. And then it will be deadly. Dramatic, concise, and to the point.
Posted 07/29/2014 09:19 AM
KevinArnold:
Oh, such a poet, Blake. Not sure I've ever seen an end-of-line dash after a comma. Such confidence!
Posted 07/28/2014 11:43 PM


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