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Around the Corner
by
Charles Hanson Towne


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Around the corner I have a friend,
In this great city that has no end;
Yet days go by, and weeks rush on,
And before I know it, a year is gone,
And I never see my old friend's face,
For Life is a swift and terrible race.
He knows I like him just as well
As in the days when I rang his bell
And he rang mine. We were younger then,
And now we are busy, tired men:
Tired with playing a foolish game,
Tired with trying to make a name.
"Tomorrow," I say, "I will call on Jim,
Just to show that I'm thinking of him."
But tomorrow comes--and tomorrow goes,
And the distances between us grows and grows.
Around the corner!--yet miles away . . .
"Here's a telegram, sir . . ."
                                                      "Jim died today."
And that's what we get, and deserve in the end:
Around the corner, a vanished friend.


This poem is in the public domain.
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Charles Hanson Towne (1877-1949) was an author, editor, professor, and poet. Born in Louisville, Kentucky, his family moved to New York City when Charles was just a toddler. By the time he was eleven, Charles was writing and publishing his own magazine; he grew up to edit several of New York’s most esteemed periodicals, including Harper’s Bazaar.

 


Post New Comment:
nadia ibrashi:
Wise and beautiful.
Posted 07/10/2011 03:38 PM
Katrina:
ouch!
Posted 07/10/2011 10:27 AM
dianapoet:
So true. Grateful for friends.
Posted 07/10/2011 09:11 AM


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